1922: Writer Dr. Frank Crane

From a 1922 issue of The American Magazine:

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Personal — And Indiscreet

The story of my travel on the Long Road of Life, from my boyhood ambitions, through the experiments of young manhood, on to the time when I could call myself “The Happiest Man I Know”

by Dr. Frank Crane

This article is going to look egotistic, because it will be about myself. But that is not my fault. I did not write this piece and offer it to The American Magazine. It was ordered by the Editor.

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1922: Cattleman Murdo Mackenzie

Notes:

1) A man who needs a gun is no man
2) No effort is ever wasted, even if unpaid
3) Knowledge can be spent repeatedly, money just once
4) Circumstances can be better than any “life plan”
(For numbers two and four, also see: 1922: General Manager Edward M. Skinner)

From a 1922 issue of The American Magazine:

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Do You Use Fair Play or “Gun Play” to Gain Your Ends?

In the heyday of Western “bad men” Murdo Mackenzie refused to carry a gun. The pistol toters killed themselves off; but Mackenzie, by straight thinking and fair dealing, lived to become one of the world’s cattle kings

by Neil M. Clark

The very name, Murdo Mackenzie, carries a hint of something interesting. No one needs to be told that the name comes from Scotland. It is as Scotch as the heather in the Highlands, where Murdo Mackenzie was born.

That was in 1850; and in the seventy-two years which have passed since that time Mackenzie has lived an extraordinary life.

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1922: Child Prodigy Harold M. Finley

From a 1922 issue of The American Magazine:

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How Do You Account for This Unusual Boy?

Harold M. Finley may not know as much as your boy, but he certainly knows a great deal for a little fellow of five. He is the only child of Mr. and Mrs. Harry M. Finley, of McConnellsville, Ohio. His father is a lawyer. The boy is ready for all the fun that is going. He enjoys his little automobile, his tricycle, and his blocks. But when he uses his mind he is different. His fame has spread so far that Professor R. L. Morton, of the Ohio University, visited McConnellsville and subjected him to a series of tests, which were later put on record in the “Journal of Educational Research.”

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1922: General Manager Edward M. Skinner

From a 1922 issue of The American Magazine:

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Can You Size Folks Up As This Man Does?

Experiences and ideas of one of the shrewdest credit men in the United States

by Allen Sinsheimer

I was talking with Edward M. Skinner, of Chicago, who is recognized as one of the best credit men in the country — a man with a positive genius for sizing up the human beings with whom he comes in contact. And I had asked him how he could determine, in the course of a short conversation with a person, a stranger, whether or not that person was honest.

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1920: Engineer Charles Lee Cook

Two notes:

1) Writer B.C. Forbes is he who co-founded Forbes magazine.

2) I became interested in Cook because Forbes apparently did an entire book about him with the same title as this article.

From a 1920 issue of The American Magazine:

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A Genius Who Never Walked a Step

The extraordinary story of Charles Lee Cook — a Louisville invalid, who, against great odds, has achieved wonders

by B. C. Forbes

A cripple who has never been able to walk a step in his life, and who was taken from school when seven years of age, recently refused a forty-thousand-dollar-a-year job.

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1922: Stiltwalker Kenneth Hill

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From a 1922 issue of The American Magazine:

Going Through College on Legs 16 Feet High

Back in 1911, nine-year-old Kenneth Hill’s gang in Beloit, Wisconsin, poked fun at him because he seemed unable to walk on 24-inch stilts like the rest of the boys. To-day, at nineteen, he is helping himself through college by ambling around the United States on the tallest pair of stilts in captivity.

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1922: Traffic Manager Marie Melchior

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From a 1922 issue of The American Magazine:

A Fleet of 150 Trucks With a Girl at the Helm

Miss Marie Melchior is traffic manager of a big fleet of motor trucks, certainly an unusual role for a woman. But consider the further fact that Miss Melchior is eighteen years old. Yet she directs the operation of one hundred and fifty motor trucks.

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1922: Artist Reuben Goldberg

Update: Text that was missing due to Google Books OCR problem has been restored and a new scan of the final page image is also in place.

Yes, the one who became famous as Rube Goldberg! And this is well before he devised his “machines.”

From a 1922 issue of The American Magazine:

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1922: NCR General Manager Jack Barringer

From a 1922 issue of The American Magazine:

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(Google scanner clamps block some text, above.)

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$1,250 for a Shine

But “Jack” Barringer made that shoe-blacking episode a million dollars to the National Cash Register Company, of which he is General Manager

by B. C. Forbes

What would you think of a man who would order a shoe-shine costing $1,250 of his company’s money? You would feel like calling him crazy. Yet that is exactly what a certain big executive did. And he was not crazy; for that shoe-shine did more than any other one thing to enable his company to sell more goods last year than in any pre-war year in its long history.

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1922: Mining Engineer Cuyler Adams

From a 1922 issue of The American Magazine:

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How the Needle of a Compass Pointed the Way to Fortune

The story of Cuyler Adams, who discovered one of the greatest deposits of iron ore in the world. A true romance of business, of science, and of human nature

by Neil M. Clark

As the sidewheel steamer “Keeweenaw” nosed into harbor on one of her infrequent trips to the head of Lake Superior in the year 1870, a lad of eighteen eagerly watched the unfolding of hill and forest behind the little frontier town of Duluth. The lad had fed upon the romances of Fenimore Cooper; and he had been told that a scant hundred miles away, under the shadowing forest of tamarack and spruce, Indians trapped and hunted and fished, much as they had in the times when Cooper had written about them.

The lad’s name was Cuyler Adams. In his pocket was fifty dollars, the gift of his grandfather, and his stake for a fortune. And in the fifty years that have passed since that day, his life has been as full of romance as that of any of the characters created by Cooper.

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